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Hello. I have been having some health problems lately. I don’t know what’s causing this, maybe it’s the stress. I have a very stressful job so this is not something that I can avoid. I’ve had chest pains for over 3 months now. I visited the doctor several time because of it and he finally diagnosed me with Refractory angina. It is a chronic condition. I wanted to ask you is there anyone here with that type of illness? Please share your experience regarding it. And can you tell me what are the treatment options for people with this problem. Thanks.

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Hi there Leya!

Well this issue definitely requires a cardiological and cardiothoracic surgery assessment. It is recommended that all angina patients should be treated according to the same patient – principles that are previously available to refractory angina sufferers. I found this last week when I was reading about this.

Also, your doctor and cardiologist need to determine how to treat it because sometimes the treatment is different from the traditional approach.

You also need to know that the treatment of refractory angina stars with the management of risk factors and the implementation of evidence based therapy for chronic stable angina.

 

Good luck!

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Refractory angina can unfortunately be a very challenging clinical condition. It seems like it’s becoming more and more common. There are some traditional revascularization procedures. And of course patients are provided with maximal medical therapy.

 The treatment of this condition is directed at instituting therapies which  to decrease mortality. These therapies inclde: revascularization, lipid reduction, antiplatelet therapy and β-blockers. These can also help  to improve symptoms.

There are some new approaches now available to patients who still have the symptoms after they have had standard therapies. Those new approaches include newer drugs, EECP, TMR, and also the potential for cell-based and gene therapies.

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Hello everyone. Well, there is the technique of counterpulsation. This technique was studied for a long time.  Doctors think that it is a safe and also highly beneficial for patients with angina. It is also not so expensive.

Some studies that are done lately show that enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP) therapy can help in many ways. It can improve symptoms and it can also help in decreasing long-term morbidity by using several mechanisms.

 Those mechanisms include improvement in endothelial function, enhancement of ventricular function, promotion of collateralization, regression of atherosclerosis,  improvement in oxygen consumption and peripheral "training effects" similar to exercise.

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Patients with refractory angina are becoming more and more common, I don’t know why is that happening. I’m familiar with some treatment options.

I’ve read that many clinical trials in the last twenty years shown that EECP therapy is very safe and also very effective for these patients with refractory angina.

So if I were to deal with refractory angina, I would definitely go with this therapy. Of course, that’s just my opinion, I would certainly let the doctor give me his opinion on the subject. She must know better than me. I’m just saying that judging by what I’ve read, this therapy is the best option.

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Hello everyone. My ex girlfriend was diagnosed with refractory angina. But still I haven’t learned a lot about it. I know that there are several treatments and they include TENS, SCS, thoracic epidural anesthesia and percutaneous myocardial laser. Now, depending on the case, the doctor will find the best treatment options for you. Sometimes this disease can be bad. I remember that during the treatment, my ex didn’t want to eat, she couldn’t eat actually and she lost a lot of weight. I really hope that everyone can be cured of this without having any side effects. Good luck there. 

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Hello guys.

It depends is it acute or chronic. But definitely treatment strategy should be based on:

  • Symptoms and types of symptoms,
  • Extent of provoked myocardial ischemia,
  • Extent of coronary artery pathology,
  • Pathogenesis,
  • Presence or absence of comorbid disease.

After test and analyses doctor will tell you what is the best treatment option.

Recently, I have heard about some new treatment principles and they are emerging in current practice such as metabolic modulation, novel interventional techniques and therapeutic angiogenesis.

You see, there are so many different factors. Your doctor knows the best.

Just stay positive.

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Hello. I suffer from refractory angina too.
I came here hoping I’ll hear some positive experiences about it since I’ve been feeling a bit down lately because of my condition.
I am in constant pain. I have a sister who is a doctor and she takes really good care of me. She is 16 years older than me and her kid is 5 years younger than me so she has always been treating me like her child.
She helps me a lot, but I am still in pain every day.
I am about to have spinal cord stimulation, hopefully that will help me with the pain.
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