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Hello.
I am male, 54. I am taking Oxycotin for my chronic back pain, and I begun to realize that I am somehow addicted to it. My doctor warned me this could happen, but I didn’t thought this could happen to me. I was never addicted to anything, cigarettes, alcohol, drugs, nothing. And now I am somehow experiencing withdrawals!!! I even read somewhere that oxycotin has very similar effect as heroin. Is all this true? Am I addicted to a pill? What should I do?

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Hello!
This can happen to anyone, not just you. And it doesn’t matter you were never addicted to anything, now you are addicted to oxycotin and this is the first step facing that. When stopping oxycotin, you will (as you already noticed) experience some withdrawal symptoms. Oxycontin withdrawal symptoms include hot and cold sweats, heart palpitations, constant pain in muscles and joints, vomiting, diarrhea, nausea, uncontrollable coughing, depression, insomnia and many others symptoms. It is pretty much like heroin or cocaine withdrawals.
Oxycontin is very powerful pain reliever and has become hot street drug. It’s effect is like effect like high grade heroin gives. But it can have much worse consequences.
It is nothing strange that people get addicted because of it. Oxycontin is an opium derivate (also is heroin). It is used for cancer patients and patients with chronic pain (like you). Addiction is not avoidable when person is abusing Oxycontin in high doses and in certain period of time. Eventually body adapts and develops tolerance for it. Addiction results in cravings for Oxycontin, this cravings are so powerful as with any other addiction. And then again this addiction is connected to feelings of euphoria and pleasure.
If I were you, I would talk to my doctor and friends and ask them to help go through this. Everyone has its own way to face addictions, but most universal is facing it with exercise. Trust me, I have been there. I am an ex heroin addict. I hade 3 attempts of cutting with it and my family even send me to Portugal to get healed, and when I came back, soon after I was back on heroin. Then I DECIDED. You must decide, NO MORE. I started with exercise. First, of course you have to deal with physical addiction, which is the easiest part. Then comes mental addiction, thinking about heroin (in your case Oxycontin). Trust me, this is not easy. But when these times come, remember what you DECIDED! 2 years have past and I still sometimes think about heroin, when I got stressed, I would kick it in the vein…huh! NOOOOO!!! That would mean I would be on the beginning again and the next day would be day one.
Good luck!
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There are some physicians who may ask to move you to Methadone to detoxify you. This is your option, and your decision alone to make. I have included a lengthy response which will give you an idea who I am, that I have experienced what you are, and the differences of experiences withdrawal symptoms on Methadone and Oxycodone (analgesic property of Percocet and Oxycontin, Endocet, etc.). Happy Reading and GOOD LUCK!

I will warn you, the reader, of this post. I will attempt to respond to the original poster’s question, regarding their husband’s withdrawals, as they pertain to Methadone and Oxycodone. In order for me to be successful, I must be thorough, but first, I see it as a requisite to give a history of me and my battle with major medical problems, so that you can see that I have been there—not once, not twice, but I am going through it for a third time (twice for narcotics), as I type. I find the typing therapeutic and helpful for me, because right now, I am running a fever, tremmoring, sweating, freezing, my stomach is cramping, my bladder is always full (or at least it feels that way), aches and pains from hell (welcome back to the real world muscles!), and I have not been able to sleep for nearly one month for more than two hours straight!

I was struck by a drunk driver back in college more than seven years ago. I have also been diagnosed with several deadly and debilitating diseases (not from the auto accident), which exacerbate my withdrawal symptoms, as well as the pain I experience as a normal part of life. Simply—I have significant spinal cord damage—and I have had many outpatient surgeries to alleviate the pain, and one inpatient surgery that nearly killed me (literally!); and finally, they want to operate again!

I have taken almost everything, including amphetamines for the pain, but this was easy to come off, compared to the narcotics. I have detoxed on three things in my short life: amphetamines (legal), Methadone (legal), and Oxycodone (legal). The most difficult was Methadone and it was done with the support of my pain management doctor(s), despite the fact that they didn’t want me to get off of the narcotics, because they knew I would be back on the narcotics. Well, they were correct, but it was worth it! I was off of them for about eight months, which was just awesome. Now, in the mean time, I would take low-dose Oxycodone for breakthrough pain, but I did not experience withdrawal (at all), because it was occasional dosing.

Unfortunately, the doctors were correct, and within eight months, I was back on to chronic narcotic dosing, which has been the case now for more than two and half years. In the last three months, I have been able to slowly get back in shape (before the accident I was running five miles in just under 25 minutes, and my muscles were in tip-top shape) by losing 45 pounds, to the point that I can run two miles in less than 18 minutes, I have gained more than 20 pounds of muscle, and I have dropped my body fat by more than 20 points! As a result, I am not in as much pain—don’t get me wrong, there are days (each week) that I cannot walk without assistance, but I believe that I can come back off the chronic dosing, at least for another eight months.

At this point in time, I have moved from a high dose of Morphine (ER), which I cut in half (cold turkey), to Oxycodone, BUT I had family with me to ensure that I was okay—in that, I was breathing. From there, I have slowly moved down 5mg every two days on Oxycodone. I am at 25 mg of Oxycodone per day, but I am to the point where I will need to go cold turkey from here on out. READ the Oxycodone section below to see why this is the case. However, I will sit at 25mg per day for 10 days before going cold turkey on the remaining 25 mg, to ensure that my body’s serum levels are at a constant plateau. IMPORTANT: It can take up to six months for your body’s serum level of 25 mg per day to sit at 25 mg per day, but after day 10, it is close enough for government work.

So, why the hell am I spending the time, energy and discomfort (okay, pain) to come off of the medication, just to go back on it? Well, I want to work again, and being that I have been on disability three times, my career gets going (moving to mid-level management within Fortune 100 companies, and I am very young) and then bam! I lose everything, and the medications prevent me from being successful. So, you’re damn right—it is very worth it, and I would do it several times a year, just to be SANE for two months! Why else are you reading this? Because you feel similarly, for whatever reason(s) you may have.

METHADONE--
Methadone is considered more difficult to get off, because the withdrawal symptoms are more difficult than even heroin. The reason for this is because of the synthetic opiates' storage in your tissue--and more importantly, the half-life of Methadone is (on average) 25 hours (13-47 hours), with peak absorption in 4 hours. However, Methadone lasts for approximately 25 hours for the average patient, BUT there are a few of us who have taken it every 8 hours to reduce the amount of Methadone needed (for pain management), by reducing the zig-zag effect of depleting and replenishment of Methadone within our tissues.

As a result, Methadone patients may not experience many withdrawal symptoms for 24-48 hours after their last dose. [Everyone is different]. After 48 hours, the symptoms of withdrawal will peak within 7-10 days and begin to lessen over the next 7-14 days; however, it depends on a number of variables: how long the patient was taking Methadone; the amount the patient was taking; how quickly the patient has chosen (or been forced) to detox; what the last amount—with respect to the patient’s peak dosage—was; a person’s weight (especially if the patient has experienced quick weight gain, because more Methadone will be stored in your tissues with less blood absorption); age; etc.

The symptoms of withdrawal, and the severity of the symptoms, depend on the variables above; but, and most importantly, it depends on the patients state-of-mind and preparation for detoxification. Most patients do not realize that there are two types of cravings—mental addiction and physical dependency. If a patient is on the Methadone for medicinal reasons, it will be easier for the patient to recover from the withdrawal symptoms, but if the patient has a mental addiction, the patient will be faced with craving to withdraw and take the Methadone as an out. Fortunately, Methadone does not have the same level of euphoria as do other chemical compounds, but nonetheless, it is still significant enough in the patient’s mind that it may not matter the chemical side.

Before covering the symptoms of withdrawal, it is important to point out one last key component of Methadone—in that, it mimics the level of peptides—such as, Endorphins, Enkephalines, and Dynorphins, which causes the brain to assume that your ARTIFICIAL level of good feeling is required for normal life functioning. As a result, the most difficult withdrawal is a MENTAL withdrawal that your brain feels you need in order to survive. This is affectionately referred to as “cravings.” These cravings WILL FORCE most patients into taking Methadone, because the cravings are too intense; hence, most professionals recommend that you seek professional help (detoxification center), so that they may monitor you for your health and to give you the support needed to NOT GIVE IN to the CRAVINGS! (IMPORTANT NOTE: I almost died coming off of my Methadone too quickly, because I wanted to show myself that I could do it as long as I WANTED to. I was wrong! I seized, and I was VERY lucky that my family was with me at the time, because the doctors had to resuscitate me and push Methadone into me to prevent an immanent heart attack. Don’t be foolish, we know you are mentally strong, why else would you be interested in reading this? Be alive to live your life after this necessary evil—PLEASE!!!)

So, what are the symptoms? Here you go! Sneezing, yawning, tearing of eyes, runny nose, excessive perspiration (cold sweats and hot sweats, especially at night), fever, dilated pupils, abdominal cramps, nausea, body aches, tremors, irritability, not to be morbid, but even death in extreme cases. Finally, sleep is your best friend during withdrawals, BUT you will find it next to impossible to sleep. I recommend taking 25-50 mg of Dyphenhydramine (Benadryl), but NOTHING ELSE! You don’t want to exchange one craving today with another craving in two months, once you are beginning to see the other side of the tunnel. (IMPORTANT: Benadryl SHOULD NEVER BE ingested in amounts greater than 50 mg every 4-6 hours, and no more than 8 pills per 24 hours, because of severe respiratory concerns. Muscle relaxants can assist (for many reasons), but again—be reasonable; DRINK lots of WATER; ensure that you get your electrolytes (banana a day, Gatorade); Ensure or Boost are excellent meal replacements, because you will lose your appetite; and make certain that you take care of your hygiene (shower, brush your teeth, put on comfortable, but NOT bedtime clothes for mental effectiveness). Lastly, there are medications (Clonidine, for example) that MAY significantly assist you while you detoxify, but reports of significant exhaustion and tiredness may make it worse, not to mention the fact that it will lower your blood pressure. I have chosen not to go this route, because the ‘cravings’ are psychological and I can beat it in my mind—‘mind over matter.’

OXYCODONE--
Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Endocet, Percodin, etc.) is easier and more difficult to detox off of, because of one major simple reason—it is a short-acting chemical compound. Methadone is longer acting (as discussed above), but the good thing behind Methadone is that you may titrate down at any milligram increment fairly easily, especially in liquid or IV (intravenous), SC (subcutaneous) form (full disclosure, mine has either been IV or pill form, however), but the Methadone is a compound that creates a MUCH STRONGER craving. The Oxycodone, especially in capsule form is more difficult at the end, in the sense, that 25 mg per day is the lowest amount the patient may titrate to before going cold turkey. (Yes—you may break the capsule open and try to figure out what half is, but at that point, and if you are really concerned, then you will need to work with your doctor(s) to use a different narcotic or delivery method.)

The reason is that Oxycodone has a half-life of 4-6 hours, which means that if you take 25 mg divided by 5 mg (each capsule) it equals 5 doses. There are 24 hours per day, so divide the 24 hours (in a day) by 5 (doses of 5 mg per dose) and you get 5 mg of Oxycodone every 5 hours, which is the median of 4 and 6 hours. Some of you smart-ones are reading this going, well, if it is 6 hours for me then I can drop to 20 mg per day before going cold turkey. You are correct, but the point is that if you spread your doses out more than 6 hours, you will certainly begin detoxing; and hence, you would start the withdrawals, especially since Oxycodone is a short-acting chemical compound.

The good side of the coin is that the withdrawal symptoms, ceteris paribus (all things remaining equal), for Oxycodone withdrawal symptoms are less intense. The withdrawal symptoms begin 4-6 hours after your last dose of Oxycodone and peak between 36 and 72 hours. You will likely notice moderate to severe symptoms for up to 7 days, moderate symptoms for up to another 7 days (14 days so far), mild symptoms for another 2 weeks after this (28 days), and various very mild symptoms for up to 5 months after the first month (if you even notice them).

Does it suck? Yes! BUT it is worth it, and I commend all of you for making the decision to go through the detoxification, REGARDLESS of the reason that you are on the medication. DON’T be ashamed that you are dependent (even if you are addicted). If, and only if, your doctor (I recommend receiving at least one more opinion, because there are non-narcotic medications that may help either reduce the level of narcotics or eliminate the narcotics altogether) recommends that you go back on narcotics, and you feel that it is the last resort, then DON’T be ashamed, either. Think of the trade-offs and which trade-off will give you the best QUALITY OF LIFE!

Be sure that you prepare your closest friends and family for what will come…ask them to read this; and understand that the vast majority of the withdrawals are the cravings, which is good, because it is mental, BUT don’t be stupid like I was—they want you alive. Read everything that you can, don’t abuse sleeping medication, or you will then need to detox off of the sleeping medication after the narcotics. Tell yourself that you can do it, and think about how proud you will be once you have completed it, and how appreciative you will feel, and how proud your family and friends will be. LIFE IS GRAND!!! I have been shot at, I have had a knife to my throat, I have broken more than 30 bones, I have worked 40-60 hours per week while taking 18 credits in school (to pay for school), etc., you get the point. I AM JUST LIKE YOU!!! We worked so damn hard to get where we are, this is a small fourteener, NOT Mt. EVEREST! You PREPARE hard for this, and when the time comes, you stick it out, and I assure you that you will be prouder than the time you worked for 265 straight days, just to get your diploma! I know I was!!! TRIUMPH and SUCCEED!!!

BEST OF LUCK TO YOU, YOUR FAMILY AND YOUR FRIENDS, because all of you are in this journey together!!!
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I;m in day 4 cold turkey thank you so much for all your info, it will and is a tremendous help. I finally slept for 4 hours straight last night, but i took codien and robaxacet (reg). Well gravol and benydrl, too. not all at once, still have pain but not sure at this point i can trust myself as to how bad it really is. You know how you can convince yourself that you need it.
I have a lower back injury and just had surgery to repair my shoulder dec.13th. (Minor surg,)
My doctor just refused to refill my persciption but did'nt bother to tell me, they said it take a couple days to refill, then I never heard from them untill day 2 I called. What a jerk or am I projecting? Just feels like he aboned me.
I'm 44 and a Mother of 5, youngest being 2, feel so quilty for her but I've not done anything to hurt her never would, just soooo screwed up right now.
I forgot to tell you I have a heart condition that requires 150 mg per day of Atenol for rapid heart, which makes me question my Dr. further. If there's a Dr. or heath professional out there please give me your opinion, anyones would be appreciated.
My heart and thoughts go out to everyone in this situation.
Thanks, Mare
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stermer wrote:



hello, i have a28 year old daughter who was in treatment for heroin she has been out about 3 months. she is still getting violently sick. she told me she is not doing any drugs, but why is she still going through such pain and vomiting very bad. she lost so much weight. I am so worried. Please help.

Thank You,

Nancy

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I too am going through withdrawls right now. I'm 42 female middle class and I have AIDS I was prescribed oxycotin for neropathy pain in my feet and legs. My doc told me it was addictive but I had no idea that it is pretty much 1 step away from herion. My 3rd husband (prize that we was) got me addicted to heroin when I was 35 and I got off cold turkey. Had I known that the oxycotin was pretty much the same thing I would have never started it. I asked him last week to take me off instaead he changed my dosage I used to take 2 - 40mg a day now it is 3 - 20mg a day. I feel like c**p I have nasuea, vomiting, diarreah, stomach cramps you name it. My husband wants to help but he has no idea what I feel like he's one of those "manly men" that work through pain. Me I just feel like crawling into a hole and staying there. I went the the hospital yesterday to try and get some relief the doctor didn't even bother to come in and see me until 5 hours later by then I was ready to just come home and be miserable. The attitude he gave me was horrible I have never had anyone make me feel so dirty about my condition. I have it I have to live with it!
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? hi everyone,
I think my cast might be a little more exteme with the dosage amount. About 3 years ago I was diagnosed with a neurological disease called CMT and there is no cure and mostly effects my legs (bottom) and hands. Any, I've been on oxycontin for 3 years now taking 320 milligrams a day. That's not including xanax (occasionly), and wellbutrin, also neurontin and restoril to help me sleep. WELL, FedEx always comes on Firday but not this week, long story but they screwed up. So now I'm out of oxy's until after the holiday. I'm going though hell and am surpised I'm on th computer..One question I have, oxy definitely helps me to walk and get up in morning. What is the reason I have to stop if it works?
Thanks for any info.,
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( I am 32, relatively young and pretty healthy. Ive been an athlete all my life had my far share of hurts and sprains. well recently i hurt my back. They put me on oxycodone and ive been on it for 6 months. ive decided to stop taking it, and let me tell you, my body does not like this. Im in pain, depressed, cant work cant sleep. im waitng for a detox bed as we speak. Ths is oneof the worst things that could happen to me. I am not a depressive person and have been known to be a fighter. and all i can think of is if i just had mypills this would go away. . . .and i have to steel myself and just grin and bear it. But for how long ? I wouldnt wish this on anyone. So this is what its like to be an addict. . . . .
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Im 17 years old and i have got myself addicted to OC. I do not get percribed them, i am an abuser =/. I was wondering if theres anyway for me to not feel these withdrawls w/o getting a oc or a suboxin? i am trying really hard to stop but there always around me. Theres these pills for sale where i live that if you take them you wont get sick. its called suboxin (may be spelt wrong)
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Cocaine is almost 100% mental addiction, nothing to even compare to opiates. I've never seen anyone with physical withdrawals coming off cocaine. It's all in the head,especially crack. I and just about all my friends did coke througout the 80's, and I know of NOT 1 PERSON to have PHYSICAL WITHDRAWALS. Not even close to the same class drug as opiates, which is both physical and mental. I put coke down one night 20 years ago, never looked back. Not 1 second of illness.
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Guest wrote:

stermer wrote:



hello, i have a28 year old daughter who was in treatment for heroin she has been out about 3 months. she is still getting violently sick. she told me she is not doing any drugs, but why is she still going through such pain and vomiting very bad. she lost so much weight. I am so worried. Please help.

Thank You,

Nancy



The cure all is SABOXIN. Find a Dr. who will prescribe it.........
I really mean it.....
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Suboxone isn't addictive at all.. they may be almost as expensive as an OC to buy fr. someone, but scouts honor it's worth it. Take them evey day for 2 weeks and no matter WHAT YOU DO.. don't take any kinds of narcotic pills while taking the suboxone, it makes some people sick. You should also stop for good, suboxone only takes way your withdrawl symptoms one time, so if you get hooked again.. it's either u quit cold turkey.. or with methadone! Suboxone really is the best way to go to quit w/ the OC's. Trust me, Ive taken atleast 80mg everyday for a few years, and it helped me! Good Luck. Also, make some lifestyle changes, if you have friends who do it.. it's harder to stop with them doing it around you!
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Im 23 an been dealing with OC addiction for the past 2 years. Where I live OC's are really expensive and fairly easy to access, but some days there just nowhere to be found, or I just cant afford them. So for the detox you start to feel that night you can take a few pain pills.. vicodin or lortab.. etc. or methadone. If you dont take methadone on a regular basis it works perfect for your detox. 1 methadone 10 mg will last you at least 24 hours.. try it.. its a life saver. I know what OC dextox symptoms feel like and i wouldnt wish that on my worst enemy. try it but dont abuse it because you'll have another addiction on your hands..
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i am a 53 yr old male that has had 47 major surgerys with cronic pain and have been on opiates for 30 years and one day decided to quit pain meds and enter into detox. i was in detox 5 times and relasped 4 times. the 5th time i stayed in for 77 days, came home and felt like c**p for 3 months. depression sat in bad, but i was determined to stay clean. my doctor told me that i would have to have opiate maintenane for he rest of my life. he told me that a new drug was out called suboxone. i went in for a check up and he gave me 1 pill. in 15 minutes i felt great. i have been reading all of the stories and was very suprised that everyone is sick, depressed, going thru withdrawals, and feel like c**p. if you are trying to stop pain meds im sorry to say that you will never make it. sooner or later you will get tired of feeling like sh*t, and relaspe. i hope all of you readers will believe me when i tell you this. you have to try suboxone it saved my life. you will feel fantastic after the first dose. you will never have to sufer with withdrawals, and i mean all of them even the worst ;-) one, depression, ever again. when i started taking suboxone there were about 1000 people on this medication in the US. today over 50,000. knowing how many people this drug will help and how good it is, i would not be suprised if it became more popular than viagra.
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I been taking Oxycontin on an average of 120mg a day for the past 3 years, never missing a day.

My question is what are the long term effects of using this drug? I mean, does it hurt the heart, or the nervious system, etc? What kind of medical problems are associated with the use of Oxycotin?

Please help me out. I have looked around, serach every where but have not been able to find an answer. All I read from the internet are insignificant information, kind of like if this drug was harmless. But I would think it has some type of bad consequences to the body. Am'I wrong here or are there really detrimental, life and death type of stuff.

I'm not talking about the negative consequences while getting high neither, I'M TALKING ABOUT THE HEALTH PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LONG TERM USE.

Thanks so much in advance.

PS: Another thing I think is killing me, is that ever since I started using OC I been smoking 3 packs of cigaretts a day. Is that bad also?
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