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Hey pet lovers.

Yesterday, my mom told me that something weird was happening with her dog. She was scared, because he was really aggressive. And, this is one lovely, Labrador dog. She asked my dad to take him to the vet, so he did it.

After he checked him, he told them that this dog has hypothyroidism.

That is one of the reasons why this dog was aggressive.

Now, she treats him, and he is a little bit better.

But, can you tell me what is the most common causes of hypothyroidism in dogs?

Tnx in advance. 

I hope that you can help me. 

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Hello. It is true, that dog can live good and quality life, with good treatment and good diet program. I am sure that he will be just fine. The most common cause of this is autoimmune thyroiditis. This is an immune mediated process that develops in genetically susceptible individuals. Also, too little iodine in the diet is the most common cause of hypothyroidism. Less common causes include previous treatment with radioactive iodine. Those are the most common causes, and once you see some symptoms, take your dog to the vet. He will do some blood analysis and he will help you. 

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Hey everyone,

I didn’t know anything about hypothyroidism until recently.

My father has an Irish setter, and as it turns out, this disease in most of the cases happens to them. It hurts to watch your dog losing his fur and gaining on weight, but at least you know why it is happening. The disease occurs when your dog is having a shrinkage of his thyroid gland, so he isn’t making enough of thyroid hormones, which are important for his metabolism.

The only medication, the only treatment is for your dog to receive shots of hormones twice a day, each day, for the rest of his life.

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Hello.

I think that this is very simple to explain. Every dog needs enough thyroid hormones.

Why?

Because they are really important for dog’s metabolism. When your dog doesn’t have enough hormones that is the first cause of hypothyroidism in dogs.

Dog Whisperer explained us this issue well, but I think that a lot of people just don’t understand what you are trying to tell us. This is much easier.

I don’t know that much, but I have learned this :)

And, I am telling this to all my friends.

Symptoms are obviously, so observe your dog. 

It is the only way! 

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I have no idea what hypothyroidism is, but I know this lady that lives in my street and she keeps talking about it. Her story makes much more sense now when I’ve read all that you wrote about this. 

According to her, her dog has it. I normally wouldn’t believe her since it wouldn’t be the first time for her to talk about her dog’s imaginary diseases, but this time her dog really does have some symptoms. 

He keeps having some skin problems and he has gained a lot of weight lately. 

She says it’s all because of that condition he has. 

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Hello.

My dog, Golden Retriever had no symptoms of hypothyroidism. He didn’t have one single symptom and there was no chance that I could notice that something is going wrong with him.

He was always perfectly healthy, and I am mad because the vet could not see that he is sick.Yes, I lost my dog because of hypothyroidism, and since then, I don’t want to have a dog. This disease happens when your dog’s organism cannot produce enough thyroid hormones.

There are a lot of symptoms, but unfortunately, my dog never had them :/

You should think about this as well.

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Hey friends.Thank you a lot for all these comments.

 

My mom had some issues at the vets office, because a lot of them just cannot explain what are the main causes of this. We are pretty much desperate, because we are trying to do anything to help this dog.

I did some research as well, and I found out that some of the causes of hypothyroidism in dogs is when dog is losing his hair, his fur is not so shiny anymore.

I am not so familiar with this, so I was hoping that you can tell me is this true. 

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There is no reason for you to be desperate.  This is not a life-threatening disease . It can be controlled and it’s inexpensive to treat.

Yes, it is chronic and your dog will have to take oral meds every day  for the rest of his life, but if you take good care of him, he will be ok. The drug your dog will be using is a hormone called levothyroxine or L-thyroxine.  Doses are individually adjusted to every dog.

You also asked about hair loss. That is indeed one of the symptoms of this disease.  Along with the weight gain, muscle loss, ear infections etc.

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