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Hey everyone :)

My sister bough a Gordon Setter recently, three days ago. I didn’t know how this dog looks like until she send a picture to me via viber. He is cute but I don’t know much about him.

Now she really bothers me with all those questions LOL :)

Well someone told her that this dog has big chances to get canine hip dysplasia. She is killing me now with questions that I just don’t know the asnwer :/

So can you tell me what dog breeds are more prone to canine hip dysplasia?

Is her dog on that list?

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I am dealing with hip dysplasia right now. :// But I am the one who has it, not my dog.

When it comes to cats and dogs, speaking in general,  smaller breeds are less likely to develop this kind of,  let’s call it, disorder (not sure if it can be called a disorder).

It is possible of course, but the fact is, large breeds are more prone to it. Here are some breeds that are statistically proven to be more prone than the others:  Newfoundland, Saint Bernard, Old English Sheepdog, Rottweiler, German Shepherd, Golden Retriever, Alaskan Malamute, Labrador Retriever, and Samoyed.

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I was about to write the same thing as a reply. It’s logical that larger breeds will be more prone to develop all sorts of bone related disorders. Especially very large breeds such as Alaskan Malamute. It’s the same thing with people. I think the main reason is maybe their weight, I don’t know.

 Gordon setter is a large breed dog if I recall well, the black one with slightly waved coat right?

They can also suffer from hip dysplasia, but they’re not as prone to it as some other large breed dogs. So tell your sister not to worry in advance.

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Hello three of you.

 

Unfortunately hip dysplasia is one of the most skeletal diseases that you can see in dogs. I think that gender is not a factor. And of course, some breeds are more likely to have genetic predisposition for this disease than any other breads.

Large breads are usually affected. Affected breads are Great Dane, Labrador retriever, German Shepard, and Saint Bernard.

But your sister’s dog can also get this disease. He is large breed as well. Of course, he is not on this list but he can also suffer from hip dysplasia.

You should let her know this.

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And guys what about Dalmatian dogs?

I don’t like the topic of the discussion at all but I’m forced to join. :/

My late uncle had a Dalmatian with hip dysplasia. When he had his first puppy he gave it to me. It was three months old.

Now my Hugo is a grown dog and he is a bit larger than other Dalmatian dogs that I know. Whenever I remember that my uncle’s Dalmatian had HD I’m afraid that might happen to Hugo too. :/

 

I see that Dalmatians are not on any of the lists, so I shouldn’t worry, right?

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Hey again.

Dalmatian – Lover, you are right totally. Dalmatian dogs are not on this list but that doesn’t mean that they don’t have predispositions to have canine hip dysplasia.

It is known that this disease affects large and giant breeds and Dalmatian dogs are large breeds.

I think that no one mentioned, but mixed dogs are also more prone to get it.

You need to observe your dog’s behavior and see are there some symptoms. I am not sure is there any way to prevent this disease, but some experts told me that every dog should exercise more. This can be a good prevention method.

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Hello. Don’t be fooled with information that just large breads are more prone to canine hip dysplasia. All breads can develop it, but larger breeds are most likely to suffer from it especially because they weight more. This problem is actually rooted in genetics. Dalmatian – lover your dog does not have so big predisposition to get it. I was researching some list and I found out that they are 151 at the list of the dogs who are more prone to develop it. Bulldogs are at the first place but still that doesn’t have to mean anything. But still, just 1,8 % of Dalmatian dog in the world can develop this disease.

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Hey everyone,

I'll agree that you can never really know if your dog is going to get this disorder or not. You can check the odds, that's true, but I don't think that you should worry about that. Your dog can be lucky or less lucky, that's how I see it. 

It makes sense that large and giant breeds are usually the ones affected by this disorder. I found out that the breeds which are more likely to get this disorder are the Great Dane, Saint Bernard, Labrador Retriever and the German Shepard. Small breeds can as well be affected but rarely, and they often show no clinical signs.

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If you are buying a dog of any breed, it would be good to look for trusted dog breeders. What does this mean? Well, it means that you should look for those dog breeders who already have numerous certificates that prove good results on different tests (eye, hearth and hip tests). Those are the diseases that can be genetically inherited. If those results are good, there is a decreased possibility that your dog will suffer from any of this diseases. In some countries, some breeds need to have these certificates. So there really are some breeds more prone to hip dysplasia, they’re all mentioned above, but you should also know that this disease  is not fatal.

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