Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

Hello. I have a dalmatian dog. About a month ago my friend (who also has a dog- a lab) and me went to see a friend. Actually we went to see our friend’s dog since she told us he has been kind of depressed. We were hoping to cheer him up. It turned out her dog had parvovirus, that’s why he seemed depressed and unhappy. She took him to the vet and luckily, he is feeling better now. The problem is- my other friend’s lab isn’t feeling very well. I think he might have caught the virus. I am now afraid for my dalmatian. Is it possible that the lab caught it and my dalmation didn’t? What dogs are the most likely to get this virus?

Loading...

Well of course,  dogs who are not vaccinated are most likely to get the virus (this includes puppies, adolescent dogs and canines). So make sure you get your dog vaccinated, it should be illegal for the pet owners not to vaccinate them (isn’t it already?). This virus affects most members of the dog family, such as wolves, coyotes, foxes, etc.I’ve read somewhere that these are the breeds which are at a higher risk when it comes to this virus: Rottweilers, Doberman pinschers, Labrador retrievers, American Staffordshire terriers and German shepherds.Dalmatians are not one of those breeds, but this doesn’t mean anything. Get your dog checked asap.

Reply

Loading...

I can't talk from my own experience, but I have heard of it from a friend of the family. Her German Shepherd was very low, he seemed sad and unwell. But after a trip to the vets, he was soon back to his normal happy self! My boyfriend's dog is a Labrador and he is vaccinated, and all I can advise it to always ensure your dog is vaccinated. I would suggest getting your Dalmatian off to the vets immediately, if you haven’t had it vaccinated already. Better safe than sorry! Tell your friend to get her dog to the vets as soon as possible too, as it seems too much of a coincidence that the Lab is now unwell too.

Reply

Loading...

Hey. Well, dogs who are not vaccinated and that is something that you should take care when you get a dog, when your dog is still a puppy. So, all vets will recommend you the main combination – of vaccine that is given in 6 and 8 weeks,  and you should give this every three weeks, for prevention. Parvovirus is spread through contact with feces containing the virus. But, still, that is something that you need to cake care when your puppy is still a pet, I always say to my friends – please, don’t wait some miracle to happen.

This is awful disease and you need to take care your puppy well. 

Reply

Loading...

I never had a dog, because I am scared to have one. I think that they ca suffer more than cats from some disease. Maybe that is my opinion, but I don’t know. I remember that time when my friend had a small Labrador, he was 5 months old. He was so cute but very soon, he got canine parvovirus…She didn’t know what was it, she didn’t treat him right, and when she went to the vet, it was pretty much too late. She didn’t vaccinated him when she needed to, because she was not informed well. That just happened and she doesn’t want to have a pet since than.

Reply

Loading...

Hey Millie. That is not a justification – she didn’t know. When she got her dog, she needed to take him to the vet, she needed to consult the vet about him, especially because she was new at this. I was not born with all this knowledge, I was learning, and I am still learning. But, now it is too late to say anything, right? If she was just reading, she could find out that Labrador retrievers have a really high risk to get this disease.  

Please, people, inform about this. If you have any issue about this, ask us, we really want to help you.

Reply

Loading...

 

After this, it is really hard to even think to have a dog. I have a dog, he is healthy, and now I am planning to adopt Labrador retriever puppy. Now, when I am reading this I think that this is hard to handle. I am not sure. I was reading a lot about this, and I know what breads are mostly like to get canine parvovirus. The main thing about this issue is that you need to vaccinate your dog immediately and you have to do this all the time, when you need. Take care of your puppy, before it is too late. 

Reply

Loading...

Every obligation is hard, but it is worth the reward. Thinking that your dog can get sick if you adopt him is totally wrong. I have a dog who is 13 yo, and he is perfectly healthy (besides of some rash), because I take care of him.
My Chubby is like a family member to me and I cannot neglect him (I am talking just about him, although we have three more dogs, but he is the eldest). We are going in walks every day, I pet him, feed him…
And, the most important, I wash him, clean after him I got him vaccinated every year. That’s why he has drastically less chance to be infected with parvo. And if you do the same, your dogs will be healthy, I assure you.
Reply

Loading...

User avatar
Health Ace
6884 posts
Why are Labs more likely to get it? It's a virus, they have to be exposed to it from somewhere. There is also a vaccination to prevent it. That's like saying I'm more likely than my wife is to get a cold because I'm Anglo - Saxon and she's German. I can assure you when our kids came home from school with a cold ---- we BOTH ended up with it.
Reply

Loading...

I must agree with njoynlife, there is no real evidence that any of dog breeds are more prone to parvo virus as it can strike anywhere and anyone. Only the most certain treat is if dog is unvaccinated or live in non-hygienic surrounding.
The conclusion is, if you vaccinate your dog regularly and take care of his hygiene, you exponentially lower the risk of him getting infected with parvo.
It can be a problem a fact that parvo can be transferred through stool of infected dog, so don’t allow your dogs to sniff on it, if someone didn’t clean after his/her dog.
Reply

Loading...