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Hello everyone. Three days ago my cousin had car accident. Unfortunately, nothing serious happened to her during this accident. I went to see her today. She lives two and a half hours away from me. I spent whole day with her and we were talking. She told me that she is happy because she is alive but she told me that because of this accident she found out that she is having some other health issues.

She was diagnosed with Venous congestion and they will do some other analyses as well.

I was wondering what is venous conestion, when does it occurs and what is causing it?

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Hey there.

I am really sorry about your cousin. Here are some information. Venous congestion is a common complication of traumatic injuries and reconstructive surgery.

It occurs when arterial inflow is greater than venous outflow. Well, when venous outflow is obstructed by clouting or even with disruption of veins, venous pressure increases. It can result in distention, stasis, ischemia, cellular deaths so as you can see it is not that naïve.

Those other tests will show some other things.

Tell me, she felt nothing before this accident? I know that one of my friends had symptoms and she went to her doctor.

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Hey there. As far as I heard, this usually happens more often to younger ladies but I still believe that there are no rules, especially in this life that we are living in.

This is also known as ovarian vein reflux and it is a cause of chronic pelvic pain in approximately 15 to 40 percent of women. Venous congestion is just one type of venous disease and there are so many of them. It describes a condition where the blood flow is slow or even incomplete. Well, in this case the blood pulls and causes excessive pain and swelling.

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Hi everyone. I am having this problem for a very long time and I was diagnosed with it when I was 34 years old. So, I do believe in statistics – that this problem usually happens in younger ladies and you need to deal with it your whole life probably. Others told you what is it and what is causing it and I will tell you how I found out that I am dealing with. Well, I had really sharp pain in my lower abdomen and this pain just came across my left leg. Because of it I went to see my doctor and I found out that I am having this problem. My grandmother had it as well.
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Hey everyone,

I would agree with everything that The Big Z wrote, he explained it pretty well. 

Venous Congestion can occur when the reconstructive surgeon is simply unable to find and reconnect adequate venous circulation or when clots obstruct the venous outlet. When surgical correction of venous congestion is not an option and arterial flow remains adequate, surgeons may choose to employ leech therapy to salvage the transferred flap.

Leeches increase tissue perfusion by actively withdrawing congesting fluids and passively by promoting bleeding. Leech therapy increases oxygenation of involved tissues, and allows time for neovascularization and thrombolysis.

It is not smart at all to leave this untreated.

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Hey Aurora,

Your friend could have noticed some symptoms regarding the Venous Congestion. 

Her skin color probably turned into dusky blue, the capillary refill time was something like 3 seconds, her tissue turgor became dense, swollen and distended, and dermal bleeding was rapid, with dark blood.

I'm glad that nothing bad happened to your friend, and I'm also glad that it helped her find out that she has Venous Congestion. She can take a look at the causes and see if she knows what's her cause.

Most common causes are blood clots in the deep veins, arteriovenous fistula, phlebitis, thrombophilia, obesity and May–Thurner syndrome.

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Hi there Aurora,

I believe that venous congestion is directly connected to acute decompensated heart failure. It is actually the main sign of this.

Some studies done in America and Europe showed that the most common sign of acute decompensated heart failure is the venous congestion rather than low cardiac output.

Venous congestion, for which the easiest symptom to notice is an increase in weight, starts to increase at least 7- 14 days before acute decompensated heart failure signs and symptoms worsen, eventually requiring urgent intravenous therapy.

Venous congestion can be a pretty serious issue, and the failure treatment mentioned above has major consequences, so it would be wise not to allow it to get to that phase.

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Hey everybody,

I knew a bit about venous congestion before, but only a bit, so I wasn't really aware that it was directly connected to ADHF (acute decompensated heart failure). I did a little research when I read your post, Stradivarius, and it appears that you are completely right. 

Some people on my dad's side of the family have heart problems so I think it's kind of a chronic thing. This frightens me so I'm trying to live my life as healthy as I can. Leading a healthy life can help you prevent getting a venous congestion or any other heart problems.
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