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So far I have been to the emergency room twice. Had a stat CT scan which was negative as well as ultrasound. At first I was diagnosed with Pancreatitis and the Vicodin sent me back to the Emergency room. Then I was diagnosed with gastritis and given the B.R.A.T diet….. (Clear liquid: soup broth, banana, toast, rice, applesauce, apple juice, pear juice, watered-down Gatorade)…….

My HIDA scan results are 92% but I have not heard back from my GI Doctor yet. I am in a lot of pain, all the time, especially after I eat and at night. I was taken off Pepcid and put on Prilosec which has not helped at all! In fact, I am taking Oxycodone at night just to deal with the pain.

My next appointment is for an Upper GI on Thursday. I really have no clue why I am in so much pain.
:-(
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To all of you out there with RUQ pain and agony, especially with a High Ejection Fraction of the Gallbladder:
You are not alone, and doctors are FINALLY BEGINNING TO LISTEN!
A ground-breaking research study was presented at the 56th Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine, presented by Dr. Kelly Holes-Lewis. Medscape Conference coverage can be viewed at:
Commenting on this important research, Dr. Harvey Ziessman (Professor of Radiology, Div. of Nuclear Medicine at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD) calls the high and very-high ejection fractions indicative of 'Hyperkinetic Gallbladders,' and says, 'If this is correct, we have to start paying attention to the upper levels.' Kelly Holes-Lewis, M.D., the author of the study, is a Resident in the Department of Psychiatry, Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, SC (former Chief Resident in Department of Nuclear Medicine at the State University of New York, Buffalo NY).
My own HIDA scan showed a 97% Ejection Fraction, and I have been unable to keep solid food down for a week since the exam. The test itself wasn't that bad for me, but within 24 hours I was sicker and in more pain than ever. My surgeon is looking into it; I feel for all of you going through this.
God Bless you!
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I am a 32 year old female that has had abdominal issues for the past three years. I have been unable to tolerate eating peanuts without horrible burning gnawing pain and nausea for about three years. In those three years I had occassional bouts of diarrhea following meals. In the past 2-3 months these issues have worsened and I know have chronic epigastric pain, mostly RUQ or mid epigastric in nature. I have bloating, abdominal pressure, nausea, occasional dry heaves, loss of appetite, severe pain and nausea associated with eating, occassional "oily stools" and a dull stabbing pain on my right and left sides of my abdomen, and pain that radiates from my mid epigastrum to my back a "seering" pain. I have none of the risk factors for gall bladder disease, am an otherwise healthy thin young woman who takes fairly good care of myself but yet all my symptoms sound like gall bladder. My lab work was text-book perfect my abd. ultrasound was normal. Had HIDA scan that showed my ejection fraction to be 99%. Have a surgical consult scheduled. Will keep posted on progress of this. I am like so many of you that I have read, felt like I was going crazy out of my mind, or a hypochondriac. Hopefully I can find out answers to give to you all.
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It definitely sounds to me like you have some sort of allergy but my question is why would you keep eatin gpeanuts if you have been unable to tlerate them?
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Chapter 2: (original post 10/02/09)
The first surgeon refused to perform any surgery on a gallbladder that was working "perfectly fine." It is now one month post-HIDA and I am still nauseated, with diarrhea most of the time (IBS/C is my normal condition) and in unremitting pain. There is also a feeling of 'fullness' below the right ribcage, and the pain radiates to my back (this is not normal back pain!) as well. It just won't go away. My GI specialist doesn't want me in pain, but she was trained to only consider the Ejection Fractions in the 30% or lower as pathological. She says, "I just don't know what to do! You shouldn't have to suffer but I can't think of anything to help you right now." I am not mad at her, I am just hoping the 2nd surgical consult goes better. I also have had elevated enzymes and a dilated duct on ultrasound, but intermittently, and I sure hope the medical community starts listening and taking seriously the patients who have to live this way.
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I'm so glad I found this forum! My pain started abruptly at work about 3 weeks ago, the pain was so severe in my RUQ that I just put my head on my desk willing it to go away. After my shift was over, I checked myself in to the ER. The ER doc did the standard blood work & gallbladder ultrasound, couldn't find anything wrong - so he sent me home.
My own family Dr, positive the culprit is the gallbladder, ordered a HIDA scan. My fraction was 96%. Without skipping a beat, my family Dr referred me to a general surgeon to get this thing out ASAP.
My family Dr couldn't tell me why it hit so suddenly, or why it happens at all. He has only seen this a handful of times & every patient has had a positive surgical outcome.
Like everybody else, the pain is severe, there is fullness right below my right ribs, the thought of eating is nauseating - and once I put solid food in my mouth I regret it. I wake up in the middle of the night with stabbing pain in my back, I have worse gas than ever - mostly burping. Nothing makes it feel better. I can't imagine going years with this problem.
And most importantly, I'm grateful to have a doctor that listened!!
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Please let us know if surgery fixes you!
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High gallbladder ejection fraction can be associated with biliary pain, that can be relieved by gallbladder surgery. My associates and I have collected a number of such cases and are in the process of submitting this to the medical literature. This is a new concept in medicine. If you would like more information please contact me at
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I was having the same problem with RUQ pain and nausea everytime I ate. I had an ultrasound, hida scan with my ejection fraction being 85%, and a normal MRI. My family dr didn't even want to do the hida scan but reluctantly sent me to have it done. I had sever pain during the test and was told it was treated for a non-existing bleeding ulcer. Finally I had an upper gi and that was normal and changed family docs and was referred to a surgeon who was pretty sure removing my gallbladder would mAke me better. I am only 19 and 113 pounds and had lost 12 pounds over 4 months of arguing with drs that wouldn't listen. I also have a very strong family history with my mom, gma and uncle all having theirs removed. I finally had it out the day before thanksgiving and am so much better. I have no more pain and am gaining weight back, I'm so glad my new family dr and surgeon listened to me and knew that my EF was higher than normal. I hope this helps I know where you all have been and it is no fun at all but we know our bodies better than anyone else.
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I have never had any problems with anything related to my gallbladder before and I was back in my small hometown and went into the ER last week in my with bad epigastric/right upper quadrant pain/back pain, with nausea vomiting and loose stools. They did a gallbladder ultrasound which was normal, and an abdominal CT which was normal. They just gave me Vicodin and Zofran and sent me home. Then the next day the pain was worse, despite not eating anything and so I went to my family practice doctor and he admitted me to the hospital because of the pain and dehydration. They did the hida scan the next day and I had an ejection fraction of 90%. They then did an EGD which was normal. The surgeon told me that there really is no protcol for removing the gallbladder with it being hyperactive, it may may things worse rather than better in the case of removing it. I don't know what to it still hurts but they just diagnosed me with biliary colic and let me go after being in the hospital for 4 days. The pain is better but its just the bloating, uncomfortable, nauseated feeling after I eat is getting just a little old. The surgeon basically told me that next time this happens then they may consider taking out my gallbladder. Help please!
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To Guest, who posted on 1/7/10, you said to contact you for more information on your studies. I'm scheduled to meet with a surgeon on Tuesday, May 18. I have been suffering from this pain and nausea since November and have been brushed aside by every doctor. My ejection fraction rate is 91%. I would like more information. How would I get my email to you privately or get the information you mention?
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I just wanted to let you know that my daughter had a 92% ejection fraction of her gallbladder also. She was so tired of being pain she stopped eating and became quite malnourished. After seeing a surgeon he wanted us to exhaust every test before he would take out her GB because sh ewas 17. She finally had her gallbladder out May 7th and is doing very well. After the surgery the surgeon remarked that it was a totally normal looking GB however a week later the biopsy showed chronic inflammation. She feels well and is doing great.
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I got diagnosed through the HIDA scan with 30% ejection fraction. I have this huge distention that runs across my upper abdomen which no doctor can diagnose---and when they do----it's either, costochondritis, gallbladder, gastritis, ulcer or different. Why can't they give me concrete answers? And I do not believe that if you have a low ejection fraction that the gallbladder should be removed---not 30% anyway. Get checked out by your gastroenterologist before seeing a desperate surgeon who wants to cut you open first and ask questions later. It's all a business.
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HELP NEEDED! I also have an elevated ejection fraction like the majority of you posting on this board. My internist referred me to a general surgeon that reviewed my "normal" test results and referred me to a GI. The GI looked at all my diagnostic test results and said my gallbladder was normal and prescribed an antispasmodic. I already have motility issues and this is bound to just make that worse. I NEED to find a GI or surgeon that will listen to me. I am in Wisconsin. Anyone have any ideas on who I could see or what I can do to educate these docs? Anyone have any medical journal articles? They are not very receptive to "lay man" articles. Anyone know of ANYTHING that could provide any relief?
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To "guest" who posted on 1/7/10 about if anyone would like further information on this new idea about hyperactive gallbladder, would you give contact info if you check back here? If anyone else has information, I'm desperate to collect as much official or anecdotal information as possible before my referral appt w/a gastro doc on Tuesday, Oct 26th. I can be reached at ***this post is edited by moderator *** *** private e-mails not allowed **
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