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Hey friends and especially cat lovers.

 

I have really important question for you.

My step sister found older cat yesterday. She was at the road and she could hit her with a car.

She didn’t move from the road.

 

She took her and this cat will be temporarily with her.

 

She took her to the vet and he told her that this cat has epilepsy. She is between 10 and 12 years old.

 

 

Can you tell me how to take care of a senior cat diagnosed with epilepsy?

She will take care of this cat as long as she can, but she is having too many animals in her house.

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Hello. You can take care of senior cat diagnosed with epilepsy with medications. Those medications are given orally. But each cat reacts totally different to some medications, and the vet should try different types of medications to find the one that is right for your cat. If you are going to keep this cat even for a while, be aware that cat can become very sleepy when she start to use medications. Soon, she will be OK. Medications are used to control epilepsy and they must be given every day. Observer this cat very closely and try to notice every change.

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I love that I’ve found this topic. I was just about to start a new one with the same title.

 I’m in a mess!! An older lady who lives in my building threw out a cat on the street (and may I mention the cat has 6 years!!) because she was diagnosed with epilepsy. The vet told her she will need to take good care of her since she has epilepsy and my dear neighbor decided it would be the best to throw her out since she can’t take good care of her. I took her home but my cats don’t get along with her very well.

I’ve found this girl who is willing to take her,  but I don’t know anything about epilepsy in cats. I will be following this topic and hopefully it will help me to help this girl and this cat.

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Omg, I wish I could take them all home with me. And that poor baby thrown out on the street after six years. My heart aches. :/

My sister has a cat with epilepsy. She takes great care of her and I don’t want to think about what would’ve happened to her if she ended up in the wrong hands. She is so sensitive.

The main care of a cat with epilepsy includes taking her to the vet, treating her with the prescribed meds. Vets usually prescribe Phenobarbital for feline epilepsy. You need to find the lowest dosage that will control the seizures.

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Hey there.

This is very, very old cat. It is so nice to hear that your sister took her and that she is trying to give her proper care.

Honestly I think that she won’t live so long.

But again it is nice to hear this.

 

When I was younger I had cat diagnosed with epilepsy. I was talking with my mom about this case three months ago, and she told me that she was treated with medications.

I don’t remember the name of this medicine but it was helpful.

Later I was talking with my vet and he told me that in this case meds and proper diet plan is helpful.

This combination probably rocks.

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Hey friends.

I am really sorry because I need to tell you this but my cat died from epilepsy when she was about nine years old. I just couldn’t find the way to treat her.

 

This cat is very old. 10 or 12 years are really big deal in cats. I was wondering when she was diagnosed with epilepsy. I know that you can’t tell me this :/

I will give you a few tips.

 

Your vet will need to perform testing such as blood test or possible brain scans.  Treating the primary condition is the proper way to start treatment of epilepsy in dogs.

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Good day everyone!

Treatment of epilepsy diagnosed in older cat should be primarily focused underlying cause, of course if you can identify the case. It is a long term treating, usually lifelong treatment. It can be treated with anti – epileptic drugs.

Vets will usually recommend you meds such as levetiracetm, gabapentin and pregabalin.

Unfortunately in many cases treatment is not as effective but treatment plan must be re – evaluated with your vet. When the treatment is not working that means that something is not OK with your cat and she needs to be treated on different way.

Don’t judge me, but this cat is really old and I am not sure is this worth of trying :/

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It is always worth of trying! I have a Siamese cat who is 17 years old and I treat her like she is still a kitten. She sometimes vomits after her meals and it is impossible for me to find the food that is convenient for her, but I never give up. I will find it eventually.
Cats can live a long, happy life if they’re well nurtured.
@DS991 Tell your sister not to give up on that cat. If she leaves her, nobody will ever adopt her. She is 10 to 12 years old plus she has epilepsy.. . :/
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I couldn’t agree more with Marcia! How can anyone think it’s not worth to fight for someone’s life? Even if it was only a few years.

I just imagine if one of my pets ended up in the hands of someone who thinks like that… it makes me so sad. They all have special needs and they’re all so sensitive… And they all require a lot of time. None of my pets have epilepsy, but one of them has a disease that requires much more strength and effort… Not to mention time and money.

But I will always think that it’s worth it.

And like I said before, my sister’s cat has epilepsy and this is something that can and must be treated.

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