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Hey need some advice, my foreskin is attached to the head of my penis by a strip of skin, which does not allow the foreskin to retract properly when erect. This causes the foreskin to swell up, and occasional bleeding. What should I do?

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There is suppose to be a strip of skin attached. I don't think it's the cause of swelling and bleeding. You should check with a doctor.

Don't try to stretch the bottom part too hard though.
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i have the same problem, its like its glued onto the head but there are some slits which i can start cutting from it... im so nervous... someone please give advice... me penis is like 1/3 of its actual size because the skin stuck on top of the head wont let it come out any further!! arghh
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This post is describing a condition known as phimosis. In some cases, the opening of the foreskin is too narrow to pass over the head. In other cases, the foreskin is adhered to the glans (head) of the penis.

Note that in infants and young children, the foreskin is normally adhered to the head of the penis. This is normal, and neither the child nor the parent should attempt to forcibly retract the foreskin. With time, the adhesions will loosen, and the foreskin will be able to move back off the head with only applying gentle pressure. This may not occur until age 12-13.

Phimosis that does not resolve on its own may become a reason on medical concern for several reasons. It may cause tightness which results in pain during erections. As young men become sexually active, they may become self-conscious regarding the appearance of their penis.

The typical medical treatment for phimosis is a combination of gentle retraction exercises and application of a prescribed topical steroid cream. The steroid cream is applied to all surfaces of the foreskin as directed, and the foreskin is gently pulled back as much as is comfortable. The foreskin retraction exercises should be performed at least twice a day.

If the phimosis is creating problems for the child, this treatment can be used as early as age 4-6, depending on the clinical situation. The boy should be taught to perform the retraction exercises himself so that he can obtain maximum retraction but without causing pain.

Phimosis frequently becomes a concern in boys age 10-14. Increasing penis size during puberty can cause phimosis which was not previously painful to become very painful during erections. Boys of this age should be able to meet with their doctor privately to discuss their concerns. While certain low-potency topical steroid creams (like hydrocortisone) are available over the counter, typically high-potency or medium potency topical steroid creams, available only by prescription, work much more quickly and are much more effective.

In cases where the foreskin is not adhered to the head, but is too tight to retract, studies have demonstrated that the use of a topical steroid cream and retraction exercises allow for complete and easy retraction of the foreskin in up to 90% of cases. In 85% cases it requires only 6 weeks of treatment. This treatment is particularly successful with older children and adolescents with non-adhesion phimosis.

Circumcision is rarely necessary for treatment. In phimosis caused by a tight foreskin (without adhesion), only about 2% will require circumcision. Even if circumcision does need to be performed, the child or his parents have the option of choosing how much of the foreskin will remain. Typically, only the tight preputial ring needs to be removed, allowing for most of the foreskin to remain. Sometimes children or the parents opt for total circumcision for cosmetic reasons, but it is medically necessary only in the most severe cases.

Either the child's pediatrician or a urologist can be consulted for the treatment of phimosis. Boys age 10 and over should always be to speak with the physician privately. Boys of this age should also be given the choice of whether or not they wish to undergo circumcision. If circumcision is necessary, it should always be performed by a physician experienced with the procedure. As with any surgical procedure, parents and their children should always seek a second opinion.
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cirp.org/library/complications/gracely1/[/url]
circumstitions.com/Restric/Botched1sb.html[/url]

It's called a penile adhesion or skin bridge due to a complication from circumcision where the foreskin adheres to the glans of the penis.

It happened to me too. I had two skin bridges, one small and one long, about an inch. They prevented my penis from erecting fully. I had surgery to have them corrected.
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Hi everyone, i read this topic with problems of myself, i think you should read this, it explains in more detail what it is and what is good and bad, i have added a link for more information:

The frenulum is a Y shaped web of skin that connects the foreskin to the underside of the head of the penis. The frenulum is kind of like the web of skin under the tongue. This is the most sensitive part of the penis, containing a huge number of nerve endings. Circumcision usually removes all or most of the frenulum. For more information see The Effects of Circumcision by Glenn M.J. Epps' Circumcision Facts. This is normal and should in some cases not cause harm. If this does then do not attempt to tear it as nature would do this if i thought it should do.


http://indra.com/~shredder/intact/anatomy/
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hope it helps ;-)
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yea, its nothing to do with the opening itslelf, theres a physical piece of flesh on the underside of the penis connecting the bottom of the "hole" to the bottome of the foreskin, you can get retract the foreskin back over the head but thats about it. Another answer pls!
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I had this problem for as long as I could remember. The foreskin was physicaly attached to the penis head. When I was 26 I had a circumsicion. I now have half a foreskin! the under side is still attached, the surgeon only removed the 'normal' piece of skin. I is better now as I was begining to get sores under my foreskin (because I couldn't clean under it).
My advice, go see a doctor and make sure you fully explain what is wrong - otherwise you could end up like me!

I am going to go back and get it sorted, but the last operation resulted in me having to have a second (dilation of the urethra, NOT PLEASANT). So when I pluck up the courage I shall return to my GP.
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im 15 and i dont now much but theres skin attached to my penis head going down attached to my foreskin
should i pull it off???
need to know asap
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Yes i have this problem to and its stopping me from pully my forskin back any further as it hurts so much if i try to. Am i ment to keep streching and the main will go awayeventaly or do i have to see a doctor to get it removed
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Need More Help Pleae :$
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hi my foreskin don't go past the head when erect i think it is the bit of skin what hold the foreskin in place is to small what shell i do
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i have that to, im a bit nervous! please if anyone knowswhat to do help !
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I also have this problem.

My foreskin feels really tight, but my girlfriend pointed out there is also a strip of skin where the foreskin is attached to the head of the penis. Is this normal?

It's painful and I've even had the problem of the foreskin folding in on itself while having sex.
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