Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

I am beside myself with worry regarding my miniature dachsy Betsy, aged 9 years old. Until a year ago she was happy lively and healthy and then quite suddenly she didn't want to play anymore.  Crispy fur and lumps appeared on her paws. They were tender to touch. She lost her coat on all four legs, chest and ears. She was sad.  So was I.  The vets I used just diagnosed dermatitis - said she was probably allergic to something. I changed her diet to fish.  I cooked salmon and white fish and carrots with her non allergic biscuits everyday.  Theonly thing that has helped her is Evening Primrose Oil which I rub on her naked coat every morning and the fur does come back, for a while, and then it goes again. But she doesn't play anymore.  I have seen to at least 6 vets and one holistic vet, Please does someone know of a really good vet who knows the score.  Cushings has been mentioned as likely but she does not follow the pattern for Cushings.   I am 85 years old and its not easy for me to get around.    Thanks for any info.    

 ***this post is edited by moderator *** *** private e-mails not allowed***Please read our Terms of Use

Reply

Loading...

Our dog was diagnosed with Atypical Cushing's 5 years ago and lived until last week, May 11th, 2013. He lived to be 12 years old. He went through chemo therapy (Lisodren) in order to shrink the glandular tissue and then was put on Prednisone for the rest of his life. He lost the weight he had gained and was agile again for a year. His skin and his coat though never went back to "normal". The disease also affected his hind legs - he tore the ligaments in both his knees - and it went downhill from there. He lost muscle mass, slowly at first, then more rapidly. At some point, he couldn't get up on his own any more. Then he couldn't walk correctly any more - he was dragging his hind feet and would roll them up and walk on the outside of the paw rather than the inside. That was during the last few weeks of his life. He didn't want to eat and he lost a lot of weight very quickly. Then his heart gave up and we had to let him go. From diagnosis to the end it took 5 years. 4 1/2 of these years were relatively good years, considering the circumstances. Monitoring the effects of Cushing's, regular check ups and the correct amount of the right medication will help a lot in keeping your dog comfortable and maintaining a certain level of quality of life.

Reply

Loading...

JOAN, I wasn't able to reply to your post specifically so I am replying to the thread.

I am sorry to hear about your little Betsy. After what we went through with our beloved Ian for so long, I would recommend that you have Betsy tested for the Atypical form of Cushing's. Symmetrical hair loss is a symptom of Cushing's. It took our vet the better part of a year to find out what was wrong with our dog because he did not have the typical symptoms. Just weight gain and hair loss. And when you shaved his leg in order to draw blood, the hair didn't grow back. There is a special, expensive test that can be performed. Our vet performed the test and the lab at the University of Tennessee (if I remember correctly) analyzed the test. That's how we eventually got the correct diagnosis. Feel free to email me and good luck for you and your little baby. My thoughts are with you.

Chris from California

Reply

Loading...

I made a mistake - our dog was diagnosed and received chemo therapy in 2009 and had a good life after that until late 2012. So that's 3 1/2 years.

Reply

Loading...


Our 14 year old Jack Russell Terrier, Buster, was recently diagnosed w/Cushings and our vet prescribed 30 mg of Vetoryl. Buster is VERY lethargic, weak, and despondent. We wondered if these are temporary side effects and if they will eventually subside; because if not, we may consider NOT treating him. I appreciate any insight anyone can offer regarding their experiences with the Vetoryl and its side effects. Thank you so much!
Reply

Loading...

my dog roxie is 7 an has been diagnosed with cushing diesease the vet tl me to prepare myself to put her down ! can you belive that !!

i said no not untill i see her suffering or in pain .

he put her on 60mg of vetoryl and after a few week i the symtoms started to reappear now shes on 120mg and doing fine she was diagnosed  months  ago.

 

 

Reply

Loading...


My doggie was diagnosed at two and half years old and lived until she was eleven and a half. She was on trilastane for 9 years, basically, and led a very, very happy and active life. She did not die of Cushings, but developed chronic kidney disease, instead. What you must be aware of is that Cushings is a disease that requires constant monitoring. The disease changes and as it does, the dosage must be changed accordingly. But this needs to be done only in consultation with your veterinarian, following tests every 3 months or as advised. This is the most critical part to understand. Trilastane is on the expensive side of the spectrum, but it is the best available at present. There is hope for him/her, but it will require your full commitment. There is also a lot of information available. It is also important to realise that not all vets are experts on Cushings. Talk to a university veterinary hospital to find a vet/teams of vets who has/have experience in the field and with whom you and your doggie feel comfortable. Dogs with cushings can leave longs lives, but will require constant monitoring and support as well as lots of love. All the best.

Reply

Loading...

AMy female Yorkie has had Cushings Disease for almost 3 years. She is 10 years old. She drinks a lot of water, I have pee pads all over the house. She is bald as can be! She use to have a beautiful full coat. She takes 0.5 ml of Trilostane 10mg once a day. She also takes sulfasalazine 3 times a day to prevent diarreah. She stays on a diet of rice and chicken. If I give her other food she gets diarreah. Her weight before she was diagnosed with the disease was 7 pounds, She now weighs 4 pounds. You can count every bone in her back and ribs. She runs and plays and loves to play with her squeak toys. At times she has problems with vomiting. I keep a close eye on her as I don't want to be selfish and let her suffer just so I can keep her here with me. When the time comes, I will let her go and miss her with all my heart.

Reply

Loading...


Hi my dog has Cushings for the past two years. She is doing fairly well, in fact in some ways best she has been in a few years. treatment is expensive, but worthwhile if your dog is still high functioning. My dog has recently developed calcium deposits in the skin which is one of the many side affects of Cushings. We are treating that with limited success.
Reply

Loading...

My 12 1/2 13lb yorkshire terrier was just diagnosed with cushings disease. Has anyone tried herbal remedy by Pet Alive called Cushex? 

Reply

Loading...

My dog has cushings and was also told 2 yes over 2 yrs ago. I think they say that cause the dog is old when diagnosed so they are only going to live a few years anywsy. My 2 cents worth.
Reply

Loading...


I would say it probably has nothing to do with the food, I fed my dog the best dog food, but she still have cushings.
Reply

Loading...


Hi, when my Westie had Cushings, I found a forum with enormous information. 
Unfortunately I lost my pup last year.
Good luck and all the best.

 ***this post is edited by moderator *** *** web addresses not allowed*** Please read our Terms of Use

Reply

Loading...


My dog, Jake, was diagnosed with cushings disease over 2 years ago and they said he had three months. He'll be turning 11 in June. He has slowed down, but is still getting along great. I just had his blood test done in agian 2 months ago and they again said he didn't have long, but hopefully he'll live to enjoy another summer.
Reply

Loading...


I treated my dog (a shorty Jack Russell) with medication for cushings, but I took him off it because it was making him lethargic also. I read more about it and the mediacation doesn't help slow down the progression of cushings, it just helps them with their symptoms (thirst and hunger), so basically giving him the medicine was just to keep him from tinking in the house. Instead, I taught him to pee on a potty pad. He has lived over 2 years since being diagnosed (and I'm sure he had it a long time before being diagnosed because he had an enlarged liver for quite a while). Anyway, as soon as I took him off the meds, he was jumping around and happy again.- best decision I made!
Reply

Loading...